(Reblogged from chujo-hime)
(Reblogged from auntytimblr)

hogwartsforeverhome:

hanadoodles:

PETITION TO MAKE LEARNING ANOTHER LANGUAGE COMPULSORY IN ENGLISH-SPEAKING COUNTRIES FROM A YOUNG AGE BECAUSE ENGLISH SPEAKERS ARE LAZY ASSWIPES WHO EXPECT EVERYONE TO SPEAK ENGLISH AND NEVER BOTHER EVEN LEARNING ANY OTHER LANGUAGE.

Actually, most of us would love speak another language but our education system sucks so we literally learn 4 words. It’s not because we are all lazy.

(Reblogged from maddiesaur)

lzbth:

swag won’t pay the bills but apparently neither will your degree

(Reblogged from ruinedchildhood)

rambozus:

dragondistractsme:

Fox News 0 - Science 1

SUCK IT, FOX NEWS.

(Reblogged from chujo-hime)

livebloggingmydescentintomadness:

tumblr

image

tumblr in october

image

(Reblogged from chujo-hime)

iseeavoice:

therainbowgorilla:

qalaba:

iseeavoice:

A human getting pissed at their vampire boyfriend so they put in a silver sterling tongue stud and bracelets and earrings and their vampire boyfriend is just standing five feet away like “babe. c’mon.”


Vampire: “The fair is in town, maybe a date will help…”

human spends the whole time in the hall of mirrors

#AREYOUSERIOUS

WE HAVE A NEW WINNER.

(Reblogged from selfmadesuperhero)
(Reblogged from ruinedchildhood)
(Reblogged from fyeahenglishbulldogs)

Let’s Talk About Movies:

Mise-en-scène - Proxemic Patterns

Film: Persona (19668)
Dir. Ingmar Bergman

Proxemic patterns is the relationships of organisms within a given space—can be influenced by external considerations. Proxemic patterns are perfectly obvious to anyone who has bothered to observe the way people obey certain spatial conventions in actual life. But in movies, these patterns are also related to the shots and their distance ranges. Although shots are not always defined by the literal space between the camera and the object photographed, in terms of psychological effect, shots tend to suggest physical distances.

Each proxemicpattern has an approximate camera equivalent. The intimate distances, for example, can be likened to the close and extreme close shot ranges. The personal distance is approximately a medium close range. The social distances correspond to the medium and full shot ranges. And the public distances are roughly within the long and extreme long shot ranges. Because our eyes identify with the camera’s lens, in effect we are placed within these ranges vis-à-vis the subject matter. When we are offered a close-up of a character, for example, in a sense we feel that we’re in an intimate relationship with that character. In some instances, this technique can bind us to the character, forcing us to care about her and to identify with her problems.

Throughout this scene, which contains no dialogue, Bergman uses space to communicate his ideas—the space within the frame and the space implied between the camera (us) and the subject. 

  1. The character is in a hospital room watching the news on television.
  2. Suddenly, she sees a horrifying scene of a Buddhist monk setting himself on fire to protest the war in Vietnam. She retreats to the corner of the room.
  3. Bergman then cuts to a closer shot, intensifying our emotional involvement.
  4. The full horror of her reaction is conveyed by the extreme close-up, forcing us into an intimate proximity with her.
(Reblogged from cinematicfantastic)

kitsunecoffee:

thekumazone:

Owls may be symbols of wisdom, but they’re actually complete morons

I’M BIG DON’T TOUCH ME

(Source: owls-only)

(Reblogged from caffeinatedqueer)

micdotcom:

danceisagodgivengift:

Women’s Halloween costumes make me mad.

Us too. Unfortunately, this isn’t a new trend.

(Reblogged from ruinedchildhood)

(Source: nicolas-chocolat)

(Reblogged from takemetothedungeons)

pixalry:

Disney Character Oil Paintings - Created by Heather Theurer

(Reblogged from amberfox17)
(Reblogged from hello-shellhead)